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Psyllium for IBS

For roughly the past year, I had been suffering from IBS-D: daily diarrhea and unformed stools.

Before starting psyllium, these episodes were a daily thing, no matter what I ate. Some foods exasperated the problem of course, such as large amounts of dairy or fatty foods.

Never Dry

The worst part about the diarrhea wasn’t the actual diarrhea. The worst was that my stools were so badly formed, that I could LITTERALLY never wipe myself properly — the paper was never clean. I could go through an entire roll and I would still be “wet”. To make matters worse, 15-30 minutes later I would feel wet down there again. Sure enough, upon returning to the bathroom,  the paper looked as if I hadn’t wiped myself at all!

After using the bathroom ONCE I would have to return at least TWO MORE TIMES before feeling clean down there. So, one episode of diarrhea would probably amount to about 1 hour of bathroom use. If I had 3 episodes of diarrhea in one day, you can imagine how much time would be spent in the bathroom.

Pysllium for IBS-D

Now, psyllium is generally recommended for sufferers of IBS-C. That is, people who are constipated regularly. That is because it enlarges and softens the stool so it can more easily pass through the bowels. However, psyllium offers much to IBS-D sufferers  as well! :

You see, psyllium has the amazing ability of swelling up 50x its regular size. This causes the stool to be larger, and better formed. This controls the diarrhea, and keeps it “together” so it stays clean. That is why psyllium is often said to “promote regularity”. 

CLEAN stools

I NEVER have a bad episode in the bathroom any more.

Yes, since starting psyllium my stools are better-formed and PERFECTLY CLEAN. That is, even if they are a little soft, they NEVER require extreme amounts of toilet paper. In fact, more often that not there is NOTHING ON THE PAPER! You really don’t know the difference until you’ve experienced the power of psyllium.

Here is the psyllium that I take EVERY day. I pop 8 tablets twice daily with a full glass of water. That’s a total of  16 500mg tables of the fiber = 8 grams.

Wishing my fellow IBS-D sufferers the very best!

UPDATE 10/2011:
I am now down to taking 4 psyllium capsules twice daily. I’m doing very well on that! When drinking alcohol I will sometimes increase by 2-3 capsules. Whenever taking additional fiber, additional water should always be drunk. Once I forgot to do so, and some of the psyllium powder entered my throat (NOT PLEASANT!).

/S

 
February 9th, 2011
Okategoriserade

3 Responses to “Psyllium for IBS”

  1. Katy says:

    Thank you! I’ve been suffering for a little over one year. Same story as you – didn’t matter what I ate. I will try the psy husk fiber! FYI: Yesterday, on “The Doctors”, a butt-specialist :) says he recommends to ALL patients one teaspoon per day! I’ll start with that. Blessings!

    • Shawny says:

      You might want to opt for the capsules…even though they are more expensive, we are still talking pennies a day. The powder form gunks up your teeth and gums…

  2. Lane says:

    Taking fiber for IBS with diarrhea is a great idea — I had the same exact problem — hugely embarrassing and super irritating to my bottom. The pysllium capsules made all the difference — no more leakage and diarrhea down by 90%.

    The problem is that too many people think of psyllium as a laxative, which it can be. But when you have liquid diarrhea, it usually has the opposite effect and will actually help bind and control the iiquid. I didn’t beleive it until I tried it. But you do have to start with a low dose because too much at once can lead to gas, cramping and discomfort. Start with one or two capsules a day at most, add one more every 5 days — and don’t take them all at once.

    I find that 4-6 psyllium capsules a day works well. You may need more or less. Top dose is something like 12 a day but that’s for people with severe constipation. You should not need that much to get your diarrhea under control.

    BTW this regime was recommended to me by a public health nurse. Even my doctor wasn’t very helpful — seemed to know nothing about IBS except that it’s “incurable.” Geez.

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